Minnesota faith leaders join lawmakers to pressure Trump to reunite migrant children with parents

"We all know that our society is judged by how we treat the most vulnerable."

Susie Jones
June 26, 2018 - 2:54 pm

Susie Jones / WCCO Radio

Minnesota lawmakers joined members of the Twin Cities faith community Tuesday in an effort to put pressure on the Trump administration to reunite thousands of separated families that were seeking asylum in the US.

The group of Jewish, Catholic and Protestant leaders acknowledged President Trump's recent plan to reunite the children with their parents, but they voiced opposition to the original separation policy and called on the government to act more quickly.

"People from all backgrounds were appalled at the taking of children away from their parents and housing them in a big box store a few weeks ago, " said State Senator Melisa Franzen at the press conference that she hosted at the Capitol.

Who spoke:

Ethan Roberts, with the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas:

"We all know that our society is judged by how we treat the most vulnerable," said Ethan Roberts, with the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Rev. Andrew H. Cozzens, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of St Paul and Minneapolis:

Cozzens said in his work he's had the opportunity to meet many immigrant families. "I've come to know personally the suffering and the poverty that they often flee when they come here to this country seeking safety," he said.

Rev Doug Mitchell with the Minnesota Council of Churches:

“As a follower of Jesus, I have to wonder how this country has come so far from Jesus's admonition to let the children come unto me.”

Judy Halper, the CEO of The Jewish Family and Children's Service of Minnesota:

"Separating children will of course cause long-term if not permanent damage to the children,”

President Trump last week signed an executive order that would reunite families, which has begun but there are still many parents who don't know where their children are.