food

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RADIO.COM Staff
May 14, 2020 - 10:09 am
McDonald’s is asking restaurant owners throughout the country to make dozens of changes to ease coronavirus concerns before reopening their dining rooms.
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In this Dec. 8, 2009 file photo, a butcher places beef on display at Costco in Mountain View, Calif. U.S. meat supplies are dwindling due to coronavirus-related production shutdowns. As a result, some stores like Costco and restaurants like Wendy's are limiting sales. U.S. beef and pork processing capacity is down 40% from last year. On Monday, May 4, 2020 nearly 20% of U.S. Costco, Sam's Club, Hy-Vee and Kroger are limiting purchases of meat to avoid panic buying. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, file)
AP
May 05, 2020 - 5:49 pm
The effects of the coronavirus pandemic have moved beyond meat processing plants and are now hitting dinner plates. Several U.S. production plants have been temporarily shuttered in the last two weeks after hundreds of workers were sickened by the virus. That has led to meat shortages, with Wendy's...
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President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Gov. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., on the coronavirus response, in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
AP
April 28, 2020 - 7:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took executive action Tuesday to order meat processing plants to stay open amid concerns over growing coronavirus cases and the impact on the nation's food supply. The order uses the Defense Production Act to classify meat processing as critical...
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FILE - This April 8, 2020, file photo shows the Smithfield pork processing plant in Sioux Falls, S.D., where health officials reported dozens employees have confirmed cases of the coronavirus infection. Meat isn't going to disappear from supermarket shelves because of outbreaks of the coronavirus among workers at massive slaughterhouses, but there could be less selection and higher prices as plants struggle to stay open. Smithfield Foods has halted work at the plant, as of Monday, April 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Stephen Groves, File)
AP
April 27, 2020 - 11:39 am
Meat isn't going to disappear from supermarkets because of outbreaks of the coronavirus among workers at U.S. slaughterhouses. But as the meat plants struggle to remain open, consumers could face less selection and slightly higher prices.
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