Undergraduate education

Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and his brother, John Diaz, 7, watch videos as their parents, Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
AP
November 09, 2019 - 12:18 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Karina Ruiz's life is deeply rooted in Phoenix. She has three children and two grandkids, a side gig selling houses, frantic days rushing kids off to school and activities, a busy work schedule filled with meetings. The 35-year-old knows that little of this would be possible without...
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FILE - In this April 26, 2019 file photo, Kyle Kashuv, a survivor of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Fla., speaks at the National Rifle Association Institute for Legislative Action Leadership Forum in Indianapolis. On Monday, June 17, 2019, Kashuv said that Harvard University revoked his acceptance over racist comments he made online and in text messages about two years ago. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)
June 17, 2019 - 5:18 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A survivor of the Parkland school shooting announced Monday that Harvard University withdrew his admission over racist comments he made in a shared Google Doc and text messages nearly two years ago. In a series of posts on Twitter, Kyle Kashuv shared several letters he received from...
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Gordon Caplan of Greenwich, Conn., walks out of federal court Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in New York. Fifty people, including Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, were charged Tuesday in a scheme in which wealthy parents allegedly bribed college coaches and other insiders to get their children into some of the nation's most selective schools. Caplan, who is co-chairman of the international law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher, was accused of paying $75,000 to get a test supervisor to correct the answers on his daughter's ACT exam after she took it. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
March 13, 2019 - 9:13 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Colleges and companies moved swiftly to distance themselves from employees swept up in a nationwide college admissions scheme, many of them coaches accused of taking bribes and others prominent parents accused of angling to get their children into top schools by portraying them...
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